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Cross Creek

The second largest Cape Fear River town during the eighteenth century, Cross Creek was formed in 1756,  was combined with Campbelltown in 1778, and was later named Fayetteville in 1783.  During the Revolutionary War,  the town was a hotbed of wartime activity and a home of divided loyalties.

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Bunker Hill Covered Bridge

Designated as a National Civil Engineering Landmark in 2001, the Bunker Hill Covered Bridge is the only remaining wooden example of the Improved Lattice Truss patented by Brigadier General Herman Haupt and one of only two original covered bridges remaining in North Carolina. 

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Plank Roads

To bring wealth and awake their state from its supposed economic slumber in the antebellum era, North Carolinians advocated the use of plank roads in the late 1840s.  These wooded highways were purported to be an improvement over rough, dirt roads and a necessary step to create an intrastate (an eventually interstate) trade network of plank roads, railroad hubs, and seaports.  Such an effort was considered much needed, as one historians puts its, because plank roads could free “citizens from the bondage of primitive roads.” 

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Fayetteville and Western Plank Road

“The longest and most noted of the plank roads constructed in North Carolina,” the Fayetteville and Western Plank Road stretched 129 miles from Fayetteville to Bethania, a Moravian village outside of Salem.  But its size contributed to its demise as a major avenue of trade.

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Morehead City

In the mid-nineteenth century, John Morehead expressed interest in establishing a port city.  He and Silas Webb visited Carteret County to determine whether a large port could be developed.  Impressed by the location and potential of Shepard’s Point, Morehead purchased six hundred acres of property.  With that property, the Shepard Point Land Company was formed, and on November 11, 1857, the first town lots were sold.

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North Carolina Railroad

North Carolina Railroad’s financial success made some wonder whether politicians and their friends unduly benefited from the railroad’s construction.  For instance, the North Carolina Railroad passed through Hillsborough, Salisbury, and Concord–all three, hometowns of politicians, who strongly supported the construction of the railroad.

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Ellis, John W. (1820-1861)

Born in eastern Rowan County, in what is now part of Davidson County, on November 23, 1820 to Anderson and Judith Ellis, John Willis Ellis was a North Carolina lawyer, legislator, judge, and Democratic governor during the Civil War.

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Carteret County

Carteret County, North Carolina was formed in 1722 out of Craven County.  It is named in honor of Sir John Carteret, who later became the Earl of Granville and one of the Lords Proprietors of North Carolina.