Revolution Era

Subject

Colonial North Carolina

Joel Lane, Raleigh’s “Founding Father”

1664-1775

Joel Lane (1739 or 1740–1795) was a North Carolina political figure active in the colony’s preparation for the American Revolution. After the war ended, he was one of the many North Carolina Anti-Federalists. Anti-Federalists opposed ratification of the U. S. until James Madison promised to add a Bill of Rights.

Political History

NC Signers of the Declaration of Independence

1776-1835

North Carolina played an important role in the beginning of the United States. Three North Carolinians signed the Declaration of Independence: William Hooper, John Penn, and Joseph Hewes.

Commentary
Federalist

N.C. Has a Long History as Battleground State

1776-1835

North Carolina many times has been a battleground state and a determining factor in national debates. A study of the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, and in particular what has become known as the “Connecticut Compromise,” provides an example of how North Carolinians provided key votes in the budding new union.

Commentary
Ratification Debates

Constitution Day Marks Good Time For Reflection

1664-1775

September 17 is Constitution and Citizenship Day. It is important to remind ourselves of the Constitution, and other founding documents, for as No. 21 in Declaration of Rights in the 1776 N.C. Constitution reminds us: “a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles is absolutely necessary, to preserve the blessings of liberty.”

Federalist

North Carolina’s Long History as a Battleground State

1776-1835

During the past several presidential elections, North Carolina has been described as a “purple” or battleground state. This is nothing new. North Carolina many times has been a battleground state and a determining factor in national debates. A study of the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, and in particular what has become known as the “Connecticut Compromise,” provides an example of how North Carolinians provided key votes in the budding new union.

Commentary
Early America

A U.S. Supreme Court Justice Who Met an Unfortunate End

1776-1835

Many United States and North Carolina history enthusiasts are aware that President George Washington nominated James Iredell, Sr. (namesake of Iredell County, North Carolina) as one of the first justices on the U.S. Supreme Court. Far fewer are aware of James Wilson.

Revolution Era

Thomas Wynns (1760-1825)

1776-1835

Thomas Wynns was a politician and general from Hertford County, North Carolina. He served in the North Carolina House of Commons, the North Carolina Senate, and in the United States House of Representatives. He was also commissioned as a major general in the North Carolina militia.

Revolution Era

Josiah Collins, Sr. (1735-1819)

1664-1775

Josiah Collins, Sr. (1735-1819) was a prominent businessman, merchant, plantation owner, and land speculator from Edenton, North Carolina. Collins was a well-respected member of the Edenton community, and he engaged in global trade, rope making, land development, and farming. He built and operated Somerset Place on Lake Phelps, which became one of the largest plantations in North Carolina and the upper South.

Commentary
Colonial North Carolina

Defending Liberty From The Bench

1664-1775

A jurist and pamphleteer from North Carolina, Maurice Moore opposed the passage and implementation of the Stamp Act (1765).  He was the father of Alfred Moore, a justice on the United State Supreme Court.  

Revolution Era

Battle of Cowan’s Ford (February 1, 1781)

1776-1835

General Nathanael Greene and his Southern Patriot army strategically retreated Lord Cornwallis’s pursuit in the final months of the Revolutionary War. Greene hoped to wear the Brits down as he played an elusive game of cat-and-mouse in the North Carolina backcountry. However, the defeat at the Battle of Cowan’s Ford delayed his overall tactical objective.

Revolution Era

Battle of Ramsour’s Mill (June 20, 1780)

1776-1835

With Georgia and South Carolina under British control, Lord Cornwallis focused all attention on North Carolina.  Two Tory commanders, Lt. Col. John Moore and Maj. Nicholas Welch, mounted an early attack on the Patriots in Lincoln County in June 1780. The Patriots, eventually learning the whereabouts of the Loyalists, launched a surprise attack at Ramsour’s Mill on June 20, 1780. At the Battle of Ramsour’s Mill, an outnumbered Patriot force routed the Loyalists.

Early America

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790)

1664-1775

The subject of Scottish folklore and myth, Flora MacDonald assisted Prince Charles Stuart in his escape from King George II during the Jacobite rebellion. In 1774, Flora and her family moved to the North Carolina colony, and Flora’s husband and son fought for the Loyalists during the Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge. The Jacobite heroine returned to her native Scotland in 1779 where she died