Modern Era

Subject

Commentary
Modern Era

Echoes From the Past

1946-1990

A recent history column briefly described An Inch of Snow (1964), an out-of-print novel depicting a state legislative race in North Carolina.  It was more than entertainment depicting small-town North Carolina life. The novel’s fictitious speeches by Democratic and Republican candidates reflect the actual economic concerns of North Carolinians in the 1960s.  The arguments offered are often repeated nowadays in print and on air and behind debate podiums and at dinner tables across the state.

Commentary
Jeffersonians

Antifederalists Would Be Proud of Rand Paul’s Filibuster

1836-1865

When U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., filibustered in March, the old-fashioned way, talking for approximately 13 hours and questioning whether the president had the constitutional authority to use unmanned drones to kill American noncombatants on U.S. soil, he unnerved many politicians and talking heads.

Business and Industry

“Live at Home” Program

1916-1945

Governor O. Max Gardner implemented the Live at Home Program in 1929. The initiative encouraged farmers to increase food and livestock production in order to improve farm conditions and provide for year round family farm consumption.

Modern Era

Alton A. Lennon (1906 – 1986)

1916-1945

Alton A. Lennon was a Democratic U.S. Senator from North Carolina between 1953 and 1954.  Prior to that from 1957 to 1973, he was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Alton was known as one of North Carolina’s most conservative politicians.

Commentary
Colonial North Carolina

Comparing the Occupy Movement to Our Regulator Rebellion

1664-1775

America's difficult economic situation has generated often contradictory reactions and proposed solutions. One part of America blames the big banks. Another points to the government. Still others, with a more subtle insight, find fault with the combination of big government and big corporations. All this reminded me of the protests during the 1760s and early 1770s in Piedmont North Carolina called the Regulator Rebellion.

Commentary
Modern Era

“Senator Sam” Continues to Offer Lessons of Authenticity

1916-1945

"Yes, I was born right over there. You can see I haven't gotten very far in life," remarked former Sen. Sam Ervin while pointing to his birthplace, a white house across the street from his residence in Morganton.

Commentary
Modern Era

2011 General Assembly Is More Momentous Than You May Think

1916-1945

In January 2011, the Republican Party of North Carolina took control of both houses in the General Assembly. Many have stated that Republicans haven't been in this position since the 1890s. Truth be told, the last time was the late 1860s.

Commentary
Modern Era

Keep the Focus Closer to Home

1866-1915

All the name-calling, finger-pointing, dealmaking, and hollow sound bites during the recent debt-ceiling debate led me to conclude this: If Americans keep looking to Washington for all the answers, we shouldn't expect anything better from politicians who seem more worried about the 2012 election than the nation's future.

Education

Terry Sanford (1917–1998)

1916-1945

At the onset of the 1960s, Terry Sanford was elected the 65th governor of North Carolina. A lifelong Democrat, Sanford championed improving the state’s educational system at all levels, embodied the spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, strove to fight poverty, and desired to expand the Research Triangle Park. Despite serving only one term, Sanford’s programs transformed Southern politics, specifically in education and race relations, and contributed to his legacy as a political hero in the New South.  

Commentary
Modern Era

How Jesse Helms Made the Reagan Revolution Possible

1946-1990

Thirty-five years ago, on March 23, 1976, voters in North Carolina helped shape the course of history. Their decision to support the presidential hopes of former California Gov. Ronald Reagan in the Republican presidential primary kept Reagan in the race for the 1976 GOP nomination and opened the way for his 1980 election as the 40th president of the United States.

Modern Era

Racial Justice Act

1990-present

During the 2009 Session of the General Assembly, Senator Floyd McKissick(D) from Durham County introduced the Racial Justice Act SB461. The act provides a process by which statistical evidence could be used to establish that race was the basis for seeking or obtaining the death penalty in any case. The Act allows pre-trial defendants and inmates on death row the opportunity to challenge the decision to seek or impose capital punishment. 

Commentary
Modern Era

Champions of Freedom: Alexander Solzhenitsyn and Jesse Helms

1946-1990

Nobel Laureate Alexander Solzhenitsyn and US Senator Jesse Helms spent more than one-half of their lives without an awareness of each other's existence. They spoke different languages. They met only a few times, yet they forged a relationship that allowed them to help shape events that brought down one of the world's most powerful governments. By examining the commonalities of these two men, their relationship, and their shared values, we can gain an understanding of their passion and the importance of their message for all of us today.