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Brogden

Curtis Hooks Brogden served the state of North Carolina for half a century as a state representative, state senator, state comptroller, U.S. Congressman, lieutenant governor, and finally as the 42nd governor.

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Scales, Alfred M. (1827-1889)

Alfred Moore Scales was born on November 26, 1827 in Rockingham County on his family’s plantation, Ingleside. Caldwell first studied at the Caldwell Institute in Greensboro before transferring to the University of North Carolina in 1845. Scales studied law under the tutelage of Judge William Battle and passed the bar exam in 1852.

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Worth, Jonathan (1802-1869)

A Randolph County native, Jonathan Worth was a Reconstruction Governor.  During the antebellum era, Worth as a state legislator stood against nullification and refused to attend the state secession convention.  He became a reluctant Confederate, however.  After the South was divided into military districts, Worth refused to run for reelection and was removed from office after William Holden’s election.

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Stokes, Montfort (1762 - 1842)

A former U.S. Senator who became governor of North Carolina, Montfort Stokes was born in 1762 in Virginia.  During his political career, he befriended Andrew Jackson and supported the seventh President’s politics, including denouncing nullification as detrimental to the Union.  As a state legislator and governor, Stokes worked harder than most previous governors to further the interests of western North Carolina (Piedmont and the mountains). 

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Morehead, John Motley

Known as the “Father of Modern North Carolina,” John Motley Morehead was the 29th governor of the Tar Heel State from 1841-1845. 

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Reid, David S. (1813-1891)

A U.S. Congressman and later a U.S. Senator, David Settle Reid served as North Carolina’s governor from 1851 until 1854.  The Democrat is known for playing an instrumental role in the demise of the North Carolina Whig Party with his adroit debating in the 1848 election.  He is also known for being supportive of public education and for defending what he believed to be southern rights.

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Bragg

 Thomas Bragg served as the governor of North Carolina from 1855-1859. Bragg’s terms have been noted for the broadening of manhood suffrage and for internal improvements, most notably the North Carolina Railroad.

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Kitchin, William Walton (1866-1924)

During the late 1800s and early 1900s, much like Governor Charles Aycock, Governor William W. Kitchin was part of a new wave of Democratic leadership in North Carolina—a group that earned a reputation for being progressive in regards to government regulation while promoting white supremacy.

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Charles B. Aycock (1859-1912)

Charles B. Aycock served as Governor of North Carolina (1901-1905), when a “strange amalgam of views toward race and reform,” writes historian Milton Ready, “came together in the move by Democrats to do away with the black vote without violating the Fifteenth Amendment or eliminating a vast number of white illiterate voters through the suffrage amendment.”  

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Craig, Locke (1860-1924)

Lesser known than his Progressive predecessors, including Governor Charles B. Aycock, the “Little Giant of the West” nevertheless implemented significant conservation and transportation programs. Early in his political career, Locke Craig was a Populist who supported William Jennings Bryan’s presidential candidacies; however, the Buncombe countian soon worked to help the White Supremacy movement regain control of North Carolina, became a Democrat who served in the North Carolina House and lost the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate.  He became Governor of North Carolina in 1912.