Colonial North Carolina

Subject

Agriculture

Gristmills: North Carolina’s First Public Utilities

1664-1775

Gristmills—mills that use water power to grind corn and wheat into flour—were a “familiar feature of the 19th century countryside,“ wrote Grimsley T. Hobbs in 1985. They were also North Carolina's first public utilities.

Colonial North Carolina

Joel Lane, Raleigh’s “Founding Father”

1664-1775

Joel Lane (1739 or 1740–1795) was a North Carolina political figure active in the colony’s preparation for the American Revolution. After the war ended, he was one of the many North Carolina Anti-Federalists. Anti-Federalists opposed ratification of the U. S. until James Madison promised to add a Bill of Rights.

Colonial North Carolina

Lotteries in Early North Carolina

1664-1775

We think of lotteries as modern, but they were a popular way of raising money in early North Carolina—in colonial times and especially during the Early Republic after the American Revolution. Between 1759 and 1834, North Carolina’s legislature authorized 101 lotteries, according to a tally by Alan D. Watson.

Colonial North Carolina

John Harvey (1714–1775)

1664-1775

John Harvey has been called “the great leader in the eventful times immediately preceding the Revolution.”1 He died in 1775, after the Lexington and Concord battles in Massachusetts launched the American Revolution. Thus he did not take part in the revolution’s most active phase. He was, however, a powerful force in North Carolina for three...

Colonial North Carolina

N.C.’s Samuel Johnston Played Important Role in Founding

1664-1775

His work influenced politics and law in the years leading up to and following the Revolutionary War.

Colonial North Carolina

North Carolina’s Ratification Debates Guaranteed Bill of Rights

1776-1835

The 1787-89 debates over ratifying the Constitution offer another example of North Carolina's longstanding role as a battleground state in U.S. political history.

Commentary
Colonial North Carolina

North Carolina’s Ratification Debates Guaranteed Bill of Rights

1776-1835

The 1787-89 debates over ratifying the Constitution offer another example of North Carolina's longstanding role as a battleground state in U.S. political history.

Colonial North Carolina

Regulator Dispute Literally Made North Carolina a Battleground State

1664-1775

Tar Heels may be surprised to learn that North Carolinians, with opposing opinions, once unfortunately settled their political debate on an actual battleground—the Battle of Alamance (1771).

Colonial North Carolina

Enfield Riot (1759)

1664-1775

Leaving Halifax County on a wintry January day, approximately two dozen men travelled seventy miles to Edenton and kidnapped Francis Corbin.  The land agent was hauled back to Halifax County and sequestered in Enfield with his subordinate Joshua Bodley.  After four days, the two co-agents agreed to demands to be more transparent in their official operations, and the rioters were assuaged—at least temporarily.  What transpired those four days is known as the Enfield Riot (1759). 

Commentary
Colonial North Carolina

Defending Liberty From The Bench

1664-1775

A jurist and pamphleteer from North Carolina, Maurice Moore opposed the passage and implementation of the Stamp Act (1765).  He was the father of Alfred Moore, a justice on the United State Supreme Court.  

Commentary
Colonial North Carolina

Inglis Fletcher’s Novels Offered Entertaining Perspective Of Early N.C. History

1916-1945

Maybe more so than any other novelist below the Mason-Dixon line, including the 19th-century William Gilmore Simms of South Carolina, Inglis Fletcher of North Carolina painted the most comprehensive, historical portrait of the land on which she lived.

Commentary
Cities

Names of Streets and Parks in Raleigh Loaded With History

1776-1835

Street signs can be much more than guideposts. They often can provide interesting clues into an area’s history.