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Teague Band (Civil War)

After the Civil War, many educators and reformers flooded into North Carolina and into its mountains, to uplift the Tar Heel. According to historians John Inscoe and Gordon McKinney, there were writers who perpetuated an endearing hillbilly stereotype, and some Americans discussed visiting the mountains again on vacations. 

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Johnston County (1746)

Johnston County, established in 1746, is named in honor of Royal Governor Gabriel Johnston. Smithfield is the county’s seat, and agriculture remains the strongest indicator of the area’s economy. Johnston’s primary historical attraction is the Bentonville Battleground State Historic State which preserves the last battlefield of the Civil War.

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Haywood County (1808)

Haywood, a western, mountain county of North Carolina, was established out of Buncombe County in 1808. Named after John Haywood, the county is home to the Great Smoky Mountains, Maggie Valley, and Lake Junaluska. Waynesville, incorporated in 1871, is the county’s seat of government.

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Swain

The twenty-sixth governor of North Carolina from 1832-1835, David Lowry Swain was born in Buncombe County and later went on to be the third President of the University of North Carolina.

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Lowry, Henry Berry (1845 - ?)

Known to some as a local hero and to others as a criminal, Henry Berry Lowry and his armed band, consisting of Lumbees, African Americans and one “buckskin” Scot, fought the Home Guard during the Civil War and the Ku Klux Klan during Reconstruction.  The outlaw robbed from planters and redistributed wealth.  He mysteriously disappeared after robbing $28,000 from the sheriff’s office in 1872. 

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Fowle, Daniel G. (1831-1891)

The first governor to live in the current executive mansion, Daniel Fowle died while in office.  He is most known for advocating for a college for women that later was called University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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Brogden

Curtis Hooks Brogden served the state of North Carolina for half a century as a state representative, state senator, state comptroller, U.S. Congressman, lieutenant governor, and finally as the 42nd governor.

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Morehead, John Motley

Known as the “Father of Modern North Carolina,” John Motley Morehead was the 29th governor of the Tar Heel State from 1841-1845. 

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Bragg

 Thomas Bragg served as the governor of North Carolina from 1855-1859. Bragg’s terms have been noted for the broadening of manhood suffrage and for internal improvements, most notably the North Carolina Railroad.