African American

Subject

African American

Thomas Day (1801- ca. 1861)

1836-1865

Famous for his craftsmanship, Thomas Day, a free African American, became one of North Carolina's most prolific and respected furniture makers in the state. Born to free parents in Dinwiddie, Virginia, Day and John Jr., his brother, were well-educated.

African American

Sweet Potatoes in North Carolina History

1664-1775

North Carolina produces more sweet potatoes than any other state in the United States and has been a leader since 1971.[1] In 2021 its production represented 64 percent of total U.S. production.[2] The potatoes are grown primarily in central and eastern North Carolina. The largest producers are currently the counties of Sampson, Nash, Wilson, and...

African American

Albion Tourgée (1838 – 1905)

1836-1865

Reconstruction was a turbulent time, filled with significant political and social change, violence, and controversy. One controversial figure was Albion Tourgee, an Ohioan who moved to North Carolina for economic opportunities.

Commentary
African American

Reconstruction Bibliography

1866-1915

A list of important sources and further readings on American Reconstruction and Reconstruction in North Carolina.

Commentary
African American

Segregation Did Not Stifle Self-Help Efforts in Black Communities

1664-1775

Self-help efforts are fascinating and laudable stories. A particularly interesting one is how, in an age of de jure segregation, charitable and creative African-Americans were agents of change in their communities and were able to alleviate various economic and social problems.

Commentary
African American

Freedmen’s Bank Served Blacks in Post-Civil War Economy

1866-1915

After the Civil War, former slaves were encouraged to participate in a free-labor economy. But much of the South lay in ruins. It was difficult to find work, much less start enterprising careers.

Commentary
African American

Urban Slaves a Little-Recognized Part of The Southern Economy

1776-1835

In my experiences teaching United States history, students have a misconception that American slavery was strictly an agricultural institution. The slave labor experience, in particular, is considered one that existed entirely on plantation fields, sowing, tending, or harvesting cash crops — tobacco, cotton, or rice. Not all rural slaves worked on plantations, though; many toiled on smaller farms with a workforce of five to 10 field hands.

African American

Reconstruction Bibliography

1866-1915

A list of scholarship on Reconstruction in America and North Carolina.

Commentary
African American

Frederick Douglass Re-emerging As American Icon

1776-1835

During the past 30 to 40 years, historians have revived for Americans the legacy of Frederick Douglass (1818–95). Before then, his accomplishments largely had been swept up, dropped into the dustbin of history, and left out of view.

Commentary
African American

Success of Postwar Freedmen A Worthy Study for Historians

1866-1915

There is a deficiency in many recent histories that ignores how more than a few African-Americans found a way to prosper even during difficult times. African-Americans often were agents of change, even within a repressive environment. It is important to recognize how black entrepreneurs and property holders found niches of liberty within an oppressive system, and to examine the lessons we can learn from their experiences.

African American

Hiram Rhodes Revels (1827 – 1901)

1836-1865

A North Carolina native, Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American to serve in the U.S. Senate and in U.S. Congress

African American

Quillo

1776-1835

In 1794, a Granville County slave, Quillo, was accused of plotting a slave rebellion.