Thank you for visiting the lessons of our curriculum. This series was started by the John Locke Foundation to bring to life many of the unsung or unnoticed features of North Carolina history. We believe that in our schools a vast number of good ideas and exemplary personalities have been forgotten, and possible solutions to current societal problems overlooked. Thus, here we offer themes from history such as entrepreneurship, problem-solving by the private sector, the importance of individuals, their ideas, and the freedom to pursue them. We show how personal wealth is created, the benefits of private property, and the positive influence of religious and free market ideas, to name some examples.

To See Our Elementary Lessons, Click Here.

We believe that parents and teachers are looking for such lessons. (For more about the North Carolina History Project, see the “About” page linked to the front page.)

Some of these lessons meet the North Carolina fourth- and eighth-grade standards for North Carolina history. However, the history and traditions of North Carolina extend beyond the limited political and economic standards of the Department of Public Instruction. As indicated above, we include topics such as entrepreneurship and the founding of our state and country. We also introduce what may seem offbeat: intriguing lessons on such topics as clog dancing and lotteries in colonial and early statehood.

A Brief Guide to the Lesson Pages

The elementary curriculum tells some basics about North Carolina and its government. Special attention is given to entrepreneurs, especially African-American entrepreneurs. The lessons include enjoyable exercises that reinforce the information the children are learning. There are currently 14 lessons.

The middle school curriculum (under construction) is designed to amplify the North Carolina history lessons taught in the eighth grade in public schools. Where appropriate, lessons are correlated with a standard set by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. (See below.) However, our goal, as indicated above, is to expand beyond the narrow strictures of those standards and of much North Carolina history scholarship.

The high school curriculum (under construction) is designed to educate high school students about some of the important issues of North Carolina history such as the Declaration of Rights in the state constitution (our bill of rights). It will also acquaint them with some of North Carolina’s important but little-known figures, including signers of the Declaration of Independence and the U. S. Constitution.

How This Curriculum Meshes with North Carolina Public School Standards

North Carolina history is explicitly taught in public school in the fourth and eight grades. The following are the standards set by the Department of Public Instruction.

Fourth Grade

The following are the standards set by the Department of Public Instruction for History under the Social Studies standards for the fourth grade. (Source: Department of Public Instruction, Standard 4.H.1)

4.H.1 Understand the role of various people, events, and ideas in shaping North Carolina.

  • 4.H.1.2 Summarize the changing roles of women, indigenous populations and racial groups throughout the history of North Carolina.
  • 4.H.1.3  Explain the ways in which revolution, reform, and resistance have shaped North Carolina.
  • 4.H.1.4 Summarize the role North Carolina has played in major conflicts and events throughout the history of America.
  • 4.H.1.5 Use primary and secondary sources to compare multiple perspectives of various historical events in North Carolina.
  • 4.H.1.6 Explain the significance of historical symbols in North Carolina from various perspectives.

Eighth Grade

The following are the standards set by the Department of Public Instruction for History under the Social Studies standards for 8th grade. (Source: Department of Public Instruction, Standards 8.H.2. and 8.H2.) Recommended lessons are listed below each standard. They will be added in the near future.

8.H.1 Understand the role of conflict and cooperation in the development of North Carolina and the nation.

• 8.H.1.1 Explain the causes and effects of conflict in North Carolina and the nation.

  • 8.H.1.2 Summarize how debate, negotiation, compromise and cooperation have been used in the history of North Carolina and the nation.
  • Lesson 1 (FedsandAntiFedsLesson1.docx)
    Lesson 2 (FedsantiFedsLesson2.docx)
    Lesson 3 (FedsantiFedsLesson3.docx.)
  • 8.H.1.3 Explain how slavery, segregation, voter suppression, reconcentration, and other discriminatory practices have been used to suppress and exploit certain groups within North Carolina and the nation over time.

* 8.H.2 Understand how innovation and change have impacted the development of North Carolina and the nation.

  • Gristmills
  • Lotteries

• 8.H.2.3 Explain how the experiences and achievements of women, minorities, indigenous, and marginalized groups have contributed to the development of North Carolina and the nation over time.

  • Penelope Barker
  • Charlotte Hawkins Brown