Encyclopedia starting with h

Counties

Halifax County (1758)

1664-1775

Straddling the border between the Piedmont and Coastal Plains regions of North Carolina, Halifax County is known for its significant history and its natural geographical attractions.

Colonial North Carolina

Halifax Resolves

1776-1835

The Halifax Resolves is the name later given to a resolution adopted by the Fourth Provincial Congress of the Province of North Carolina on April 12, 1776.  The resolution was a forerunner of the United States Declaration of Independence.

Jeffersonians

Hall, Thomas H. (1773-1853)

1776-1835

An Old Republican Congressman from Edgecombe County and a friend of Nathaniel Macon, Thomas Hall consistently opposed what he deemed unnecessary federal intervention in North Carolina.  As a young man he moved to Tarboro, North Carolina, practiced medicine, and married Martha Jones Green Sitgreaves, the widow of James Green and John Sitgreaves.  Hall was first elected to Congress as a Jeffersonian-Republican (1817-1825), and again served in Congress from 1827-1835.

Civil War

Hampton, Wade III (1818-1902)

1836-1865

Wade Hampton III was one of the richest plantation owners in the South. He served as a general for the Confederacy during the United States Civil War and was engaged in battles, including Bull Run, Gettysburg, and Bentonville, from the beginning until the very end of the war. Hampton became the leader of Robert E. Lee’s cavalry forces, and he was sent southward at the end of the war to stop General Sherman. Hampton played an important role in the fighting in North Carolina. After the war, Hampton was elected as governor of South Carolina and served as a U.S. Senator.

Business and Industry

Hardee's Restaurants

1946-1990

Wilbur Hardee opened the first Hardee’s restaurant in Greenville, North Carolina, in 1960. Offering a concise but premium menu, low prices, and fast service, Hardee’s succeeded in Greenville and a second Hardee’s was soon opened in Rocky Mount. By 1963, the Hardee’s chain had gone public and it soon opened outside the United States. Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, Hardee’s became a subsidiary of CKE Restaurants, and the chain went through a revolution by offering new and better products, Monster Thickburgers, and witty advertising.

Counties

Harnett County (1855)

1836-1865

Named after the famous Revolutionary War Patriot, Cornelius Harnett, the County of Harnett was formed from parts of Cumberland County in 1855. There are several communities within the county, including Erwin, Dunn, Angier, Buies Creek, Coats, Johnsonville, and Bunnlevel. In 1859, Lillington was chartered to become the county seat for the county.

Places

Harper House

1866-1915

Considered by the North Carolina Department of Archives and History to possess the “finest Queen Anne interior styling in the entire state,” the Harper House of Hickory also has a restored landscape, including period gardens.  The Catawba County Historical Association (CCHA) raised $2,000,000 for restorations to start the house museum to interpret not only the histories of Hickory and the families who lived in the house but also the history of the Victorian South.

Business and Industry

Harris Teeter

1946-1990

  Harris Teeter is a grocery store chain founded in Charlotte, North Carolina. As of 2012, Harris Teeter operated 208 stores in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, Delaware, Maryland, Florida, and Washington, D.C.

African American

Hawkins, Reginald

1946-1990

Reginald Hawkins was as an boisterous and confrontational desegregation activist of the 1950s and 60s. His passionate avocation for racial equality propelled him to the national civil rights spotlight and helped to dismantle segregation in North Carolina and the South.

Governors

Hawkins, William (1777-1819)

1776-1835

When the War of 1812 came, North Carolinians voiced pro and anti-war opinions and debated whether the threat from England was worth answering President Madison’s call for troops.  During this time, Governor William Hawkins supported the war effort and cooperated with national authorities in defending the young United States from enemy invasion while increasingly becoming disenchanted with the national government’s lack of military assistance to ensure North Carolina’s safety.

Political History

Haywood, Jr., William H.

1776-1835

Born in Raleigh in 1801, William H. Haywood, Jr., served as a U.S. Senator from 1843 until 1846. He studied at the University of North Carolina, was admitted to the bar in 1822, and he later practiced in Raleigh. As a Democrat, Haywood served in the state legislature until moving to the U.S. Senate. Haywood resigned from office in 1846 and he practiced law until his death in 1852.

Civil War

Haywood County (1808)

1776-1835

Haywood, a western, mountain county of North Carolina, was established out of Buncombe County in 1808. Named after John Haywood, the county is home to the Great Smoky Mountains, Maggie Valley, and Lake Junaluska. Waynesville, incorporated in 1871, is the county’s seat of government.

Business and Industry

Headache Powders

1866-1915

During the early twentieth century, many Tar Heels moved to towns and urban areas to find work in mills and on railroads, while local pharmacists also began creating patent medicines. One such medicine, headache relief powders, became popular among mill and railroad workers who referred to them as “production powders.”  Pharmacists often compounded their own headache relief medicine in an easier-made powder form rather than in the more complex pill form.

Business and Industry

Heilig-Meyers Furniture

1916-1945

Two Lithuanian immigrants started a furniture company in Goldsboro that survived and grew during the Great Depression.  In 1946, the two parted ways, and the company had 19 stores by 1970.  During the next three decades, the number of Heilig-Meyers stores increased, and it grew exponentially in the 1990s (from 258 stores in 1988 to 647 stores in 1994).  The chain reached its zenith in 1998 yet lost money.  It filed for bankruptcy in 2000 and eliminated 4,400 jobs.

Modern Era

Helms, Jesse (1921-2008)

1916-1945

A reporter, television-radio executive, and U.S. Senator, Jesse Helms was born October 18, 1921, in Monroe, N.C., to Jesse Alexander and Ethel Mae Helms.  The Almanac of American Politics labeled the conservative Helms a “Jeremiah” for believing in an imminent doom and warning against the encroaching dangers of big government, communism, and abortion—to name three examples.

African American

Helper, Hinton Rowan (1829-1909)

1916-1945

Abolitionist, diplomat, and lecturer, Hinton Rowan Helper was born December 27, 1829, near Mocksville, North Carolina.  In 1857 he published The Impending Crisis of the South: How to Meet It.  This book ranked second only to Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in its influence for abolition.  Although a racist, Helper profoundly influenced American politics and doubtless hastened the demise of “the peculiar institution."

Counties

Henderson County

1776-1835

Henderson County's boundary has changed considerably since its establishment in 1838, with the formation of Polk County and Transylvania County.  The location of its county seat, Hendersonville, sparked a raging political firestorm that pitted the Road Party against the River Party.

Sports and Entertainment

Henry, O.

1836-1865

More commonly known as O. Henry, the North Carolina-born author was famous for his “O. Henry Endings” and popular short stories in the early-twentieth century. Born in Greensboro in 1862, O. Henry’s early childhood and adolescence greatly influenced his literary style and voice. Some of his famous works include “The Gift of the Magi”, “The Ransom of Red Chief”, and “Memoirs of a Yellow Dog.”

Counties

Hertford County

1664-1775

Birthplace of the inventor of the Gatling Gun, the coastal county of Hertford holds an important position in North Carolina’s history. The Meherrin called modern-day Hertford home before the arrival of early European settlers from the Virginia colony. Winton, the county seat of Hertford, was the first town destroyed by Union forces in the Civil War.

Colonial North Carolina

Hewes, Joseph (1730-1779)

1664-1775

Although Joseph Hewes was a native of New Jersey, he was one of three North Carolinians to sign the Declaration of Independence.  His business experience, education and honorable character enabled the Tar Heel to serve North Carolina vigilantly in public service for thirteen years. 

Sports and Entertainment

Highland Games

1946-1990

North Carolina was once the largest settlement area for Highland Scots who brought the Highland Games with them upon settling in the state. The Highland Games are Scottish sporting events, including tossing heavy objects and bagpipe playing, rooted in Celtic tradition. North Carolina’s largest Highland Games event occurs each July at MacRae Meadows at Grandfather Mountain.

Colonial North Carolina

Highland Scots

1664-1775

Countless Highland Scots migrated to North Carolina during the colonial period and lived primarily in the Upper Cape Fear region during the late 1770s.  Immediately the Highland Scots contributed to some of the greatest events in the state's history.  As evidenced by the modern-day Highland Games, these Scots and their families migrated to other parts of the state, where aspects of their culture are alive and well today.

Civil War

Hill, Daniel Harvey

1836-1865

Daniel Harvey Hill was a Confederate States army officer and educator.  Described as deeply religious and intellectual, Hill is most remembered for displaying an intense sense of honor, on and off the battlefield.  Hill served as a mathematics professor, founded a military institute, and was president of colleges in Arkansas and Georgia.

Early America

Hill, William Henry (1767-1808)

1776-1835

A Brunswick County native, William Henry Hill was the state’s district attorney, a state senator, a University of North Carolina Trustee, and a U.S. Congressman.  Unlike many of his North Carolina contemporaries in Congress, Hill was a staunch Federalist who, according to Lawrence F. London, “believed in a strong central government.”  

Colonial North Carolina

Hillsborough Confrontation

1664-1775

After a sheriff seized a horse for delinquent payment of taxes, Piedmont farmers used traditional means of protest to call for government to perform its proper role.  In the end, however, the Hillsborough Confrontation of 1768 failed to restore the colonial government to its proper function and started a series of events that included the Hillsborough Riot of 1770 and the Battle of Alamance. 

Early America

Hillsborough Convention of 1788

1776-1835

Meeting in Hillsborough, North Carolina, Antifederal and Federal delegates convened from July 21 to August 4, 1788 to consider ratification of the newly proposed U.S. Constitution.  The two-week long deliberations resulted in neither ratification nor rejection.  North Carolina refused to make a decision.  Ratification was postponed until the 1789 Fayetteville Convention.

Colonial North Carolina

Hillsborough Riot

1664-1775

During the 1760s and 1770s, the Regulators of North Carolina's Piedmont region worked to fight abuses they perceived to be rampant in the government of the time. Their methods, however, were controversial. 

African American

Hinton, Willis (1840-1924)

1836-1865

In spite of his illiteracy, Hinton was a successful entrepreneur.  He ran two flourishing businesses when African Americans struggled for equality and respect and the chance to participate in a free market where each held his own.

Colonial North Carolina

Historic Bath

1664-1775

European settlement near the Pamlico River in the 1690s led to the creation of Bath, North Carolina's first town, in 1705. The town's location seemed ideal with easy access to the river and the Atlantic Ocean 50 miles away at Ocracoke Inlet.

Colonial North Carolina

Historic Halifax

1916-1945

Located on the Roanoke River, the town of Halifax developed into a commercial and political center around the time of the American Revolution. A guided walking tour takes you into several authentically restored and furnished buildings. These include the 1760 home of a merchant, the house and law office of a 19th-century attorney, and the 1808 home of a wealthy landowner. The 1833 clerk's office, a jail, Eagle Tavern, and a unique archaeological exhibit are also featured on the tour.  

Colonial North Carolina

History of the Dividing Line

1664-1775

The particular never escaped the observant eye of the landed Virginian, William Byrd II. While traveling through North Carolina, the colony’s natural and man-made environments amazed the Virginia gentleman.

Business and Industry

Hodges, Luther H. (1895 - 1974)

1866-1915

Luther Hodges was the 64th Governor of North Carolina (1954 to 1961).  He also served as United States Secretary of Commerce from 1961 to 1965.  Hodges was known for his role in creating Research Triangle Park.

Governors

Hoey, Clyde R. (1877-1954)

1866-1915

The administration of Clyde R. Hoey as governor from 1937 to 1941 reaffirmed conservative rule in the state and also the power of the "Shelby dynasty," the label given to the political organization of former governor Max Gardner, Hoey's brother-in-law and fellow resident of Shelby.

Counties

Hoke County

1916-1945

Formerly comprising parts of Cumberland and Robeson counties and named after a famous North Carolinian and former Confederate general, Hoke County was established in 1911.  Two previous attempts had failed.

Governors

Holden, William Woods (1818-1892)

1836-1865

The gubernatorial impeachment of William Woods Holden serves as the only one of its kind in North Carolina history. A brilliant journalist, editor, and lawyer, Holden's political achievements would ultimately be masked by his shortcomings, including reform failure, an inability to stabilize the state during Reconstruction, and prompting an bloody war with the Ku Klux Klan. 

Governors

Holden Impeachment

1866-1915

The tumultuous Reconstruction years influenced North Carolina, and political power struggles abounded in the state.  In 1870, the Conservative Party won numerous elections, and with its newly gained power, the party worked successfully to impeach Governor William Holden (R).  His impeachment marked the second time that an impeachment of a governor occurred in United States history.  His conviction marked the first time in the nation’s history

Political History

Holland, James (1754-1823)

1776-1835

James Holland or “Big Jim” Holland was a North Carolina Militiaman and politician from Anson County, North Carolina. He served in the Revolutionary War and was elected to the North Carolina State Senate (1783, 1797) and the North Carolina House of Commons (1786, 1789). He also served in the United States House of Representatives (1795-1797, 1800-1810). Later in life Holland moved to Tennessee and served as the Justice of the Peace (1812-1818). He died in Maury County, Tennessee in 1823.

Governors

Holmes, Gabriel (1769-1829)

1776-1835

Lawyer by profession, planter at heart, Gabriel Holmes' 1821-1824 term as governor of North Carolina included a push for agricultural reform at the onset of industrialization, an integration of agrarian practices in higher education, and a commitment to the platform of the waning Democratic-Republican Party. 

Business and Industry

Holt, Thomas Michael (1831-1896)

1836-1865

An industrialist who later entered into the political arena as a friend of farmers, Thomas Michael Holt served North Carolina as its 47th governor.  His administration is known for supporting higher education and returning elective control to localities.

Women

Holton, Tabitha Ann

1836-1865

The first woman to be licensed as an attorney in North Carolina and in the Southern United States was Tabitha Ann Holton.

Churches

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Raleigh)

1916-1945

In 1924 the Greek-American community of Raleigh decided to establish a Greek Orthodox parish, and in 1935 they were served by the first resident priest.  Parishioners overcame the economic difficulties of the 1930s and collected enough money to lay the cornerstone of the first Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church on November 30, 1937.  Five months later, construction was complete.  

Early America

Hooper, William (1742-1790)

1664-1775

A representative of North Carolina at the signing of the Declaration of Independence, William Hooper risked death and sacrificed his personal income to secure the creation of the United States.  He later pursued a Federalist political ideology, which many North Carolinians disagreed with, and served as a federal judge until shortly before his death.

Cities

House in the Horseshoe

1664-1775

The story of the House in the Horseshoe, and the men who fought there during an American Revolution skirmish, reveals the nature and influence of the war in the North Carolina backcountry. One of the first “big” houses built in the frontier lands of North Carolina, the House in the Horseshoe still has bullet holes from the fighting that took place in 1781.

Colonial North Carolina

Howe, Robert (1732-1786)

1664-1775

In 1732, Robert Howe was born in Brunswick County, North Carolina.  He emerged as the colonies’ highest-ranking officer during the Revolutionary War.  Althought he supported Royal Governor Tryon in the 1760s, Howe like many others soon grew disenchanted with the English crown and evinced a strong patriotism by the mid-1770s.

African American

Human Betterment League of North Carolina

1946-1990

Created in Pasadena, California in 1928, The Human Betterment Foundation sponsored and conducted research dealing with sterilization’s physiological, mental, and social effects. Closely aligned with the Human Betterment Foundation, the Human Betterment League of North CarolinaFounded by James G. Hanes in 1947, used mass media and advertisements to promote the implementation of sterilization procedures.  In large part because of the League's work, the number of sterilizations in North Carolina increased after World War II. 

Sports and Entertainment

Hunter, James; Catfish; baseball

1946-1990

One of North Carolina’s most prolific baseball players, Jim “Catfish” Hunter excelled on the baseball mound from his young days in Hertford to his last professional years with the New York Yankees. Catfish was known for his precision pitching, and he won five World Series during his 14 year career in the major leagues. The all-star pitcher retired in 1979 to his family home in Perquimans County, and he passed away in 1999 after battling Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Colonial North Carolina

Husband, Herman (1724-1795)

1664-1775

Born in Maryland in 1724, Herman Husband was a successful farmer and an influential leader during the Regulator Rebellion in pre-Revolutionary North Carolina.  Husband represented Alamance farmers' interests and protested what he considered corrupt government and exploitation.

Counties

Hyde County (1705)

1664-1775

Vast in size, small in population, and rich in history, Hyde County is not only one of North Carolina's earliest founded counties, but also a tourism hot spot and a sanctuary for nature aficionados. 

Political History

Hyman, John Adams (1840-1891)

1836-1865

A former slave, Hyman became the first African American elected to Congress from North Carolina’s Second District in 1874, and served one term in the U.S. House as a Republican (1875–1877).