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Spencer, Cornelia Phillips (1825 - 1908)

Cornelia Phillips Spencer was not only a North Carolina poet, historian, and journalist but also a leader in the reopening of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill after it survived five, dormant years during Reconstruction.

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Hodges, Luther H. (1895 - 1974)

Luther Hodges was the 64th Governor of North Carolina (1954 to 1961).  He also served as United States Secretary of Commerce from 1961 to 1965.  Hodges was known for his role in creating Research Triangle Park.

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Oakdale Cemetery

  Located in Wilmington, Oakdale Cemetery is the largest in the city, and many prominent Wilmingtonians are buried there.  Oakdale is also known for being North Carolina’s first rural cemetery.

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Bonner, Herbert C.; Congress

Born on May 16, 1891, in Beaufort County, North Carolina, Herbert Bonner served for nearly 25 years in the U.S. Congress. As a representative of the state’s First District, Bonner sought to create jobs via federal programs for his constituents. Bonner also chaired the Committee on Election of President, Vice President, and Representatives and the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. Bonner passed away after his fight with cancer on November 7, 1965.

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Williams, Carbine (1900-1975)

One of North Carolina’s most famous inventors, “Carbine” Williams was a native of Cumberland County. While in his early twenties Williams made moonshine.  During a raid on his still, Williams shot and killed a deputy sheriff, so he was sentenced to prison for the murder. A trusted inmate, Williams spent his extra time working on gun inventions in the prison’s blacksmith shop. After his release from prison, Williams developed the prototype for the M-1 Carbine rifle, the military’s weapon of choice during World War II.

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Waccamaw

An eastern Siouan tribe that once resided in the southeastern part of North Carolina and upper sections of South Carolina, the Waccamaw lived, hunted, and fished along the rivers and swamps of the region. The Yamassee and Tuscarora Wars proved detrimental to the Waccamaw, a tribe that remained in relative obscurity until the late eighteenth century. Although the federal government has yet to recognize the tribe, North Carolina has recognized the Waccamaw, and some 1,500 members reside in Bladen and Columbus Counties.

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Brown, Bedford; House of Commons; Senate

Born in Caswell County, Bedford Brown grew up on his family farm and later attended the University of North Carolina.  Brown served in the North Carolina House of Commons and Senate before his service in the U.S. Senate (1829 – 1840).  After his resignation, Brown worked on his family farm at Rose Hill.

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Smith, Willis; Democrat; Graham, Frank P.; Senator

Born in Virginia in 1887, Willis Smith studied law at Trinity College, and he served as a inheritance tax lawyer from 1915 until 1920.  After serving in the state legislature, Smith ran for the U.S. Senate in 1950 after the death of Senator J. Melville Broughton.  Smith defeated Frank P. Graham in the Democrat Party runoff, and he thereafter served in the Senate until his death in 1953.

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University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill

  Opening its doors to students in 1795, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill upholds the distinction of being one of the oldest public universities in the country and the first public university to award degrees during the eighteenth century. Currently, UNC is ranked among several national publications that list the university as a preeminent leader in academic quality, affordability, and diversity.  As of 2012, UNC- Chapel Hill, the flagship university of the state’s public college system, has a student body of 29,137.  They are taught by 3,221 faculty.

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North Carolina State Capitol

  Located on Union Square in downtown Raleigh, the North Carolina State Capitol was opened in 1840. Today, the Capitol houses only the offices of the governor and lieutenant governor and their staff.