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Waccamaw

An eastern Siouan tribe that once resided in the southeastern part of North Carolina and upper sections of South Carolina, the Waccamaw lived, hunted, and fished along the rivers and swamps of the region. The Yamassee and Tuscarora Wars proved detrimental to the Waccamaw, a tribe that remained in relative obscurity until the late eighteenth century. Although the federal government has yet to recognize the tribe, North Carolina has recognized the Waccamaw, and some 1,500 members reside in Bladen and Columbus Counties.

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Brown, Bedford; House of Commons; Senate

Born in Caswell County, Bedford Brown grew up on his family farm and later attended the University of North Carolina.  Brown served in the North Carolina House of Commons and Senate before his service in the U.S. Senate (1829 – 1840).  After his resignation, Brown worked on his family farm at Rose Hill.

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Chowan County, Courthouse

As the oldest courthouse in North Carolina, the historic Chowan County Courthouse was constructed in 1767 in Edenton. Joseph Hewes, Samuel Johnston, and other important North Carolina Patriots used the courthouse during the 1770s and 1780s.  With the Cupola and Barker House, the Chowan County Courthouse remains an important historical structure and popular attraction in Edenton. Today, the courthouse is the oldest government building in use in the state.

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Tryon Palace

One of the largest and most ornate buildings in colonial North Carolina, the Tryon Palace was built in the late 1760s at the behest of its namesake, Royal Governor William Tryon. John Hawks was the architect, and the government assembly chambers and the house were dedicated on December 5, 1770.  Increased taxes to pay for the palace’s construction angered many Piedmont colonists.  After the American Revolution, the palace burnt down in a fire in 1798.  In 1959, after efforts to restore the site, Tryon Palace opened as the state’s first historic site.

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Haywood, Jr., William H.; Senate; Democrat

Born in Raleigh in 1801, William H. Haywood, Jr., served as a U.S. Senator from 1843 until 1846. He studied at the University of North Carolina, was admitted to the bar in 1822, and he later practiced in Raleigh. As a Democrat, Haywood served in the state legislature until moving to the U.S. Senate. Haywood resigned from office in 1846 and he practiced law until his death in 1852.

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The North Carolina Gazette

Established in New Bern, The North Carolina Gazette was North Carolina’s first newspaper. The first issue was published on August 9, 1751.

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Saponi Indians

The Saponi Indian tribe is an eastern Siouan language tribe with ancestral land located in Virginia and North Carolina. The Occaneechi Band of the Saponi and the Haliwa Saponi are recognized by the state of North Carolina. The Saponi traveled in small tight knight communities and were avid corn farmers and hunters.

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NC Botanical Garden

Located in Chapel Hill, The North Carolina Botanical Garden is managed by the University of North Carolina. The garden provides the public with a display of diverse flora and is a leading research and education center for the environment of the southeast.

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Pfeiffer University

 Pfeiffer University is a private Methodist university located in Misenheimer, North Carolina in Stanly County. In the quest for academic excellence, Pfeiffer University offered over the years new programs while remaining dedicated to its Christian beginnings.

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Merrimon, Augustus

Born in Transylvania County, Augustus Merrimon served as a U.S. Senator from 1873 to 1879 and as Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 1889 until 1892. After his service in the Confederate Army, Merrimon became a state superior court judge and he was involved in the impeachment of Governor William Holden. Chief Justice Merrimon died in office on November 14, 1892.