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Tuscarora

The Tuscarora, one of the most prominent tribes of eastern North Carolina at the time of European settlement, were a well-developed tribe that spoke a derivative of the Iroquoian language. The tribe established communities on the Roanoke, Tar, and Neuse Rivers, growing crops such as corn, picked berries and nuts. They also hunted big game such as deer and bears. Despite the tribe’s size and numerous warriors, the Tuscarora War (1711-1713) led to the migration of the tribe to New York and the near vanishing of the tribe from North Carolina.

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Saponi Indians

The Saponi Indian tribe is an eastern Siouan language tribe with ancestral land located in Virginia and North Carolina. The Occaneechi Band of the Saponi and the Haliwa Saponi are recognized by the state of North Carolina. The Saponi traveled in small tight knight communities and were avid corn farmers and hunters.

Commentary

The War of 1812

  The year 2012, marks the bicentennial of the beginning of the War of 1812, a three-year military conflict between the United States and Great Britain. Conventional wisdom tells us that the cause of war was rooted in violations of American rights including interference with trade and commerce bringing depression to the Ohio Valley. Other claims were Britain’s continued troop presence on American soil after the Revolutionary War, Britain’s prevention of American farmers from trading with France, and British naval ships seizing American sailors to be placed in their navy in the process of “impressment.” Yet, these alleged causes had existed for over a decade and many places including the New England colonies openly resisted another American foreign entanglement.

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Pilot Mountain

Known as Jomeokee, “Great Guide” or “Pilot,” to the Saura who once inhabited the region, Pilot Mountain remains a towering landmark in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Northern settlers used the mountain as a guide on their journey down the Great Wagon Road. In 1968, Pilot Mountain became the fourteenth state park of North Carolina.

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Town Creek Indian Mound

Located near Mount Gilead, Town Creek Indian Mound is a Pee Dee ceremonial burial ground.  It remains the only North Carolina historic site dedicated to Native Americans and is a well-known Mississippian culture landmark. 

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The Pee Dee Indians

  The people who lived at the Town Creek site during its heyday have been referred to as the "Pee Dee Indians" and their distinctive lifestyle, the "Pee Dee Culture." The site itself is located on the west bank of the Little River near its confluence with Town Fork Creek, in Montgomery County. A few miles downstream the Little River flows into the Pee Dee [River], which becomes the Great Pee Dee as it cuts through northeastern South Carolina to empty into the Atlantic Ocean.

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Judaculla Rock

Sacred to the Cherokee, Judaculla Rock has long remained a tourist attraction, but also a mystery to archeologists and geologists. Located in Jackson County, the large soapstone exhibits intricate carvings that Cherokee believe were imprinted by the god of all Game Animals, Judaculla or Tsu’kalu. Yet, historians and archeologists have proposed different theories regarding the rock’s meaning.

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Wachovia, Tract

The site of the first Moravian settlement in North Carolina, Wachovia, or Wachau, was the 100,000 acre tract in present-day Forsyth County. The name Wachovia was derived from Der Wachau, the name of Count Zinzendorf’s estate where the early Moravians lived in Eastern Europe. Today, most may associate the land name with the former Wachovia Corporation.

Commentary

Questions About the Role of Original Intent: Antifederalists played important role in founding era

Over the past year and a half, I have been traveling across North Carolina with my colleague Michael Sanera leading constitutional workshops. In them, we emphasize the federal nature of the American government and remind Tar Heels that knowledge of history is essential to understanding original intent and the Constitution’s meaning. The question-and-answer sessions are interesting, so I thought I’d share some of the oft- repeated questions with readers.

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Fort Defiance

The home of Revolutionary War general William Lenoir, Fort Defiance was built in 1792 in what is now Caldwell County.  Prior to Lenoir’s ownership, the house was built on a fort site that was used by British colonists.