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Enfield Riot (1759)

Leaving Halifax County on a wintry January day, approximately two dozen men travelled seventy miles to Edenton and kidnapped Francis Corbin.  The land agent was hauled back to Halifax County and sequestered in Enfield with his subordinate Joshua Bodley.  After four days, the two co-agents agreed to demands to be more transparent in their official operations, and the rioters were assuaged—at least temporarily.  What transpired those four days is known as the Enfield Riot (1759). 

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Historic Bath

European settlement near the Pamlico River in the 1690s led to the creation of Bath, North Carolina’s first town, in 1705. The town’s location seemed ideal with easy access to the river and the Atlantic Ocean 50 miles away at Ocracoke Inlet.

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Tryon Palace

One of the largest and most ornate buildings in colonial North Carolina, the Tryon Palace was built in the late 1760s at the behest of its namesake, Royal Governor William Tryon. John Hawks was the architect, and the government assembly chambers and the house were dedicated on December 5, 1770.  Increased taxes to pay for the palace’s construction angered many Piedmont colonists.  After the American Revolution, the palace burnt down in a fire in 1798.  In 1959, after efforts to restore the site, Tryon Palace opened as the state’s first historic site.