Entry

Wake Forest University

  Located in Winston-Salem, Wake Forest University was founded in 1834 and ranks 25th overall among national universities.  Distinguished for its small size, and student faculty ratio of 11:1, the school boasts a total enrollment of 7, 070 students and offers programs in liberal arts as well as graduate and professional education.

Entry

University of North Carolina, Asheville

Located in the western mountains of Buncombe County, North Carolina, UNC-Asheville remains the only distinctly labeled liberal arts university in the state. Asheville-Buncombe College, the precursor to the modern university, dates back to the late 1920s. After a significant increase in local and state funding during the late 1950s, UNC-Asheville relocated to its present location, and its student population greatly increased. Today, nearly 3,700 students attend the university.

Entry

Duke University

  Formally known as Trinity College during the mid-nineteenth century with support from the Methodist Church, Duke University has become one of the leading private research universities in the world. The school moved to Durham in 1887 and as of 2012, Duke boasts 13, 457 students from over 55 countries and 2,877 faculty.

Entry

East Carolina University

Located in Greenville, North Carolina, East Carolina University (ECU) was originally a teacher’s training college. ECU has developed into the third largest university in the University of North Carolina Higher Education System, with over 20,000 students. Notable alumni include Sandra Bullock (actress), Kelly King (CEO of BB&T), and James Maynard (founder of Golden Corral Restaurants).

Entry

North Carolina State University, NC State

Once known as the North Carolina State University of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, NCSU has become a national and international leading institution in its academia and industry-based research programs. The university was formed in 1887, and the first classes were held in October 1889. Today, NCSU boasts in a student body of 34,000 students and a faculty and staff of 8,000.

Entry

Methodist University

Methodist University was opened in September 1960 after the Methodist Church was offered land and significant funds to build a school in Cumberland County, North Carolina. The first class graduated in May 1964, and Methodist received accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in 1966. Currently, over 2,200 students attend Methodist University, and its Physician Assistant Studies programs attracts students across the state and nation.

Entry

Elon University

Once known as Elon College, the name Elon is derived from the Hebrew word for oak. The college received this name because of the large amount of oak trees in the area. In 1889, Elon College was opened, and the first class numbered 76 students. Today, over 50 undergraduate programs are offered at Elon University, and nearly 6,000 students attend the institution.

Entry

Meredith College

Recognized as the largest women’s private college in the Southeastern United States, Meredith College was created at the behest of Thomas Meredith, founder of the Biblical Recorder, in the late 1800s. Ten female students graduated as the first class in 1902, and in 1909 the college became known as Meredith College in honor of its original founder. Presently, Meredith enrolls almost 2,000 students and offers 32 majors and four graduate programs.

Entry

University of North Carolina, Pembroke

The Croatan Normal School, forerunner of UNC-Pembroke, was formed by the General Assembly on March 7, 1887, after Native Americans petitioned the legislature for a teaching school in Robeson County. Throughout the 1910s and 1930s, the school started to offer degrees other than education and in 1969 the college’s name was changed to Pembroke State University. Today, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke has a study body of over 6,900 students.

Entry

Fayetteville State University

The first normal school for African Americans in North Carolina, Fayetteville State University (FSU) was established in 1867 as the Howard School. Although FSU was once a school strictly for the education of teachers, the school grew in the 1950s as new programs were added to the institution’s curricula. Today, over 6,300 students currently attend FSU and the institution offers a Freshman Year Initiative program to incoming students.