Font Size: AAA

Timeline: 1916-1945

Showing results: 46 to 60 out of 304

Catawba Indians Encyclopedia

Once an eminent Siouan tribe that thrived in the middle Carolinas, the Catawba Nation first encountered white settlers through the fur trade. Both war and European disease proved fatal to the Catawba, and by 1760, only 1,000 had survived. The tribe, now numbering over 2,800 members, gained full federal recognition in 1993, and they live on a reservation near Rock Hill, South Carolina.

read more »

Central Orphanage of North Carolina Encyclopedia

Segregated orphanages in North Carolina necessitated the creation of an orphanage for dependent and neglected African American children. An idea for such an orphanage in Henderson, North Carolina was born, when Rev. Augustus Shepard, father of James Shepard the founder of North Carolina Central University, felt burdened when observing the squalid,living conditions of homeless African American children.

read more »

Central Prison Encyclopedia

Raleigh’s Central Prison opened in 1884 to house a growing inmate population that overwhelmed the county jail systems.  Inmate labor built the penitentiary, and one of the head architects of the $1.25 million Gothic-style complex was W. O. Wolfe, author Thomas Wolfe’s father. As of 2012, the prison contains nearly 1,000 inmates with a staff of 700.

read more »

Henry Plummer Cheatham (18571935) Encyclopedia

One of four African Americans elected to represent North Carolina’s Second Congressional district during the nineteenth century (1889-1893), Cheatham was later appointed by President McKinley as Recorder of Reeds for the District of Columbia, one of the highest federal offices then available to black appointees. He held the post from 1897 until 1901.

read more »

Cheerwine Encyclopedia

Founded by Lewis D. Peeler in 1917, Cheerwine is a Piedmont-produced and distributed soda based in Salisbury, North Carolina.  Famous for its distinct cherry flavor and burgundy color, Cheerwine has enjoyed tremendous popularity among many North Carolinians though its reception and distribution outside the state has been limited.

read more »

Cherokee County (1839) Encyclopedia

Since its charter in 1839, Cherokee County has experienced economic and demographic change.  The county's population has grown from 3,000 in 1839 to approximately 25,000.  Today, Cherokee County is a popular destination for tourists, and mountain living is a popular choice for many retirees.

read more »

Chowan County (1681) Encyclopedia

The “cradle of the colony,” Chowan County’s history survives as a vital piece to the formation of the North Carolina colony and state.  The site of the famous Edenton Tea Party and a residence of numerous patriots, Chowan served as a centerpiece for the ensuing colonial demand for independence.  Edenton, the seat of government in Chowan, was established in 1722, and numerous homes and structures built in the eighteenth century still stand and remain a testament to the town’s and Chowan’s colonial heritage.

read more »

Chowan County Courthouse (1767) Encyclopedia

As the oldest courthouse in North Carolina, the historic Chowan County Courthouse was constructed in 1767 in Edenton. Joseph Hewes, Samuel Johnston, and other important North Carolina Patriots used the courthouse during the 1770s and 1780s.  With the Cupola and Barker House, the Chowan County Courthouse remains an important historical structure and popular attraction in Edenton. Today, the courthouse is the oldest government building in use in the state.

read more »

Chowan University Encyclopedia

Chowan University, established in 1848, is a four-year higher education institution located in Murfreesboro in Hertford County. Like many other private colleges in North Carolina, the Baptists led the early formation of Chowan and the university remains affiliated with the Baptist State Convention. Today, Chowan enrolls approximately 1,300 students, and the institution offers over 60 different athletic programs.

read more »

Christ Church (Episcopal) Encyclopedia

Christ Church is located in the Capitol Area Historic District in downtown Raleigh, NC. The church was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987 and is the oldest archetype of Gothic Revival style stone church in the south.

read more »

Clay County (1861) Encyclopedia

Nestled in the southwest corner of North Carolina and in the Appalachian Mountains, Clay County benefits from a bustling tourism industry centered on its landscape and historical landmarks.

read more »

Cleveland County (1841) Encyclopedia

A southern county located in North Carolina’s piedmont area, Cleveland County was formed in 1841, and it is named after Benjamin Cleveland, leader of the victory at the decisive Battle of King’s Mountain. Gardner-Webb University is located in the county, and the city of Shelby was once home to the political machine known as the “Shelby Dynasty.”

read more »

Abbot Walter Coggin (1916-1999) Encyclopedia

Abbot Walter Coggin, O.S.B. was a cleric, scholar, teacher, and graduate of Belmont Abbey Prep School in Belmont, North Carolina.  In his career at Belmont Abbey, Abbot Coggin coached, taught, and served as president and chancellor.

read more »

Coleridge Encyclopedia

Coleridge was the home of the Enterprise Manufacturing Company, the southern most cotton mill built on Deep River. Its construction in 1882 was the final link in the chain of Randolph County’s water-powered textile industries that had begun to be forged in 1836.

read more »

Columbus County (1808) Encyclopedia

Columbus County, named in honor of the famed Christopher Columbus, was established in 1808, and its seat of government, Whiteville, was formed in 1832. The Waccamaw tribe inhabited the early region before European settlement. Some important natural attractions and features of the region are Lake Waccamaw, Green Swamp, and the North Carolina Museum of Forestry.

read more »

[1]      «      2   |   3   |   4   |   5   |   6      »      [21]


© 2014 John Locke Foundation | 200 West Morgan St., Raleigh, NC 27601, Voice: (919) 828-3876
Website design & development by DesignHammer Media Group, LLC. Building Smarter Websites.