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The Battle of Averasboro- Day Two

Janie Smith, a resident of Averasboro, wrote to a friend detailing the events of the Battle of Averasboro. Her plantation home served as a hospital for Confederate troops. Image courtesy of the Averasboro Battlefield and Museum.

Janie Smith, a resident of Averasboro, wrote to a friend detailing the events of the Battle of Averasboro. Her plantation home served as a hospital for Confederate troops. Image courtesy of the Averasboro Battlefield and Museum.


At 6:00 a.m. on the morning of March 16, the Yankees attacked. Heavy fighting occurred during the day, with many attacks and counter attacks taking place. Superior numbers allowed the Yankees to eventually force their way through enemy line forcing the Confederates to withdraw to their third line of defense. There, Confederate General William Taliaferro aligned his forces astride the Raleigh-Fayetteville Road to make a last stand.

The final Union attack occurred around 3:00 p.m. when a sharp attack was launched against the Confederate right. Confederate cavalry commanded by General Joseph Wheeler quickly stopped the attack by pouring a devastating fire into the Yankee advance. Union troops continuously attacked throughout the afternoon but were in each instance repulsed by the stubborn Confederates.Their mission accomplished, the Confederates began to withdraw during the night of the 16th. Continuous skirmishing occurred during the morning of the 17th until all troops had withdrawn.
Casualties for the fighting at Averasboro were high for both armies. The Yankees reported 477 casualties, while the Confederates lost approximately 500.


By Averasboro Battlefield Commission,


See Also:

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Timeline: 1836-1865
Region: Piedmont Plateau

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