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Alamance County (1849)

Located in the heart of North Carolina’s Piedmont region, Alamance County’s rich history, combined with its booming textile industry and significant agricultural production, make it one of the state’s most important counties.

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Vance, Zebulon Baird (1830-1894)

Widely hailed as the South’s most prominent politician during the Civil War and post-bellum periods, Zebulon Baird Vance’s decorated career as a public servant included positions in the military, the Governor of North Carolina, and a U.S. Senator.

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Pasquotank County (1668)

As one of North Carolina’s earliest settled counties, Pasquotank County’s expansive history and beautiful topography contribute to make this county a gem of the state’s Coastal Plains region.

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Hyde County (1705)

Vast in size, small in population, and rich in history, Hyde County is not only one of North Carolina’s earliest founded counties, but also a tourism hot spot and a sanctuary for nature aficionados. 

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Holmes, Gabriel (1769-1829)

Lawyer by profession, planter at heart, Gabriel Holmes’ 1821-1824 term as governor of North Carolina included a push for agricultural reform at the onset of industrialization, an integration of agrarian practices in higher education, and a commitment to the platform of the waning Democratic-Republican Party. 

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Holden, William Woods (1818-1892)

The gubernatorial impeachment of William Woods Holden serves as the only one of its kind in North Carolina history. A brilliant journalist, editor, and lawyer, Holden’s political achievements would ultimately be masked by his shortcomings, including reform failure, an inability to stabilize the state during Reconstruction, and prompting an bloody war with the Ku Klux Klan. 

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Sanford, Terry (1917 -1998)

At the onset of the 1960s, Terry Sanford was elected the 65th governor of North Carolina. A lifelong Democrat, Sanford championed improving the state’s educational system at all levels, embodied the spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, strove to fight poverty, and desired to expand the Research Triangle Park. Despite serving only one term, Sanford’s programs transformed Southern politics, specifically in education and race relations, and contributed to his legacy as a political hero in the New South.