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Scott

William Kerr Scott, from Alamance County was the governor of North Carolina from 1949-1953. As the first farmer-governor of the Tar Heel State since 1892, Scott spearheaded agriculture issues and emphasized building roads and expanding electricity into rural North Carolina. 

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Cornelius Harnett

Cornelius Harnett, was an American merchant, farmer, and statesman from Wilmington, North Carolina.  He was a leading American Revolutionary in the Cape Fear region and a delegate for North Carolina in the Continental Congress from 1777 to 1779.

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Tabitha Ann Holton

The first woman to be licensed as an attorney in North Carolina and in the Southern United States was Tabitha Ann Holton.

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The Test

On the eve of the American Revolution, the Vestry of St. Paul’s Church in Edenton wrote the “Test”, and it became a catalyst for fanning the flames of independence within the colony of North Carolina. Written approximately a month before the Declaration of Independence, the "Test" proved to be the church’s own declaration of independence.

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Port Act

The Port Act was the tipping point that ignited revolutionary passions and talk concerning independence among North Carolinians. 

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The Pirate Blackbeard

With its shallow inlets, North Carolina’s Outer Banks became a haven for many pirates during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The most notable was the Pirate Blackbeard.

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Rev. Daniel Earle

Rev. Daniel Earle from Edenton publicly stood against Britain and their infractions of the rights of free peoples.

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Wallace Wade Stadium

The Wallace Wade Stadium, which was originally named the Duke Stadium, is the home of Duke’s football team, the Blue Devils. The stadium also owns a special niche in college football history; it is the only facility outside Pasadena, California, to host the Rose Bowl. In 1967, in honor of its legendary football coach, the stadium’s name was changed to Wallace Wade Stadium.